Additional Research

Voters Believe New Health Care Law Will Increase Costs

May 4, 2010
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In the year since Resurgent Republic conducted its inaugural survey in April 2009, President Obama and Democrats in Congress have seen dramatic deterioration of their public standing, driven by disaffection from Independent voters who have steadily moved toward siding with Republican policymakers on fiscal, domestic and national security policies. More than a month since its passage, predictions by Democratic leaders that the health care reform bill would become popular with voters once passed have not proved to be accurate, despite the White House’s concerted effort to tout the bill. Overwhelming majorities of likely voters say the health care reform plan will increase their premiums, their health care costs, their taxes, and the federal deficit, while simultaneously decreasing their quality of care. Only 22 percent of voters support leaving the bill in place, while 72 percent of voters support amending and modifying it (37 percent) or repealing and replacing it (35 percent).




  1. Voters oppose the health care reform plan that Congress passed, with opposition more intense than support. Voters overall oppose the plan by a 49 to 44 percent margin, including 41 percent strong opposition and 25 percent strong support. Independents join Republicans in opposition (53 to 38 percent and 89 to 8 percent, respectively) while Democrats support the plan (82 to 12 percent). Indeed, among voters who name health care as the most important issue, 54 percent disapprove of the plan passed (46 percent strongly disapprove) and 41 percent approve (22 percent strongly approve). Intensity around the health care issue clearly remains on the side of those opposed to the bill.


  2. Overwhelming majorities of likely voters say the health care reform plan will increase their premiums, their health care costs, their taxes, and the federal deficit, while simultaneously decreasing their quality of care. Voters say the plan will increase their premiums by a 60 to 11 percent margin (64 to 8 among Independents), their health care costs by a 61 to 13 percent margin (62 to 12 among Independents), the federal deficit by a 70 to 8 percent margin (76 to 5 among Independents), and their taxes by a 73 to 4 percent margin (78 to 2 among Independents). Interestingly, pluralities of Democrats agree that those four items will be increased as well. Voters overall say the plan will decrease the quality of health care they receive by a 44 to 22 percent margin, including a 76 to 11 percent margin among Republicans and a 48 to 16 percent margin among Independents, while Democrats disagree by a 34 to 13 percent margin (46 percent of Democrats say it will have no effect on quality).


  3. Voters split between wanting Congress to “amend and modify” the plan and “repeal and replace” the plan. Thirty-seven percent of voters want Congress to amend and modify the plan (26 percent among Republicans, 43 percent among Independents, and 44 percent among Democrats), 35 percent want Congress to repeal and replace the plan (67 percent among Republicans, 36 percent among Independents, and 5 percent among Democrats), and 22 percent want Congress to leave the plan in place (4 percent among Republicans, 16 percent among Independents, and 43 percent among Democrats).



Read the full report: Independents Move Closer to Republicans On One-Party Government, Fiscal And National Security Issues

Filed under: Health Care and Polling Analysis